Jobs & Economy

The single greatest thing we could do to compete with our neighboring states to attract jobs and create new economic growth? Comprehensive tax reform. Lower rates and fewer special-interest exemptions is South Carolina’s winning formula to sustain and grow a bright economic future.

Falling Unemployment – Road to Recovery or Dead End?

Late in 2014, headlines heralded the news that America’s official unemployment rate had fallen below 6% for the first time since 2008. Surely, a sign that we’re on the path to recovery, right? A closer look says “not so fast.” From 2008 to the most complete numbers we have in 2013, South Carolina’s labor participation has seen a uniform, steady decline across gender and race, aside from a 2012-2013 rebound among Hispanic workers.

Latest Publications

The Wrong Solution for a Real Problem

How can we be compassionately responsive to the needs of low-to-middle income South Carolinians in regards to housing affordability?

How Enterprise-Friendly are SC Cities?

In order to excel in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, South Carolina must be as attractive as possible to businesses wishing to relocate to or expand in the state.

Membership in SC’s Public Sector “Unions” – Boon or Bust?

Despite their declining membership rolls, public sector unions ostensibly attract members by touting unions’ collective bargaining abilities to promote higher pay, improve benefits, and increase job security. But that’s not the case in the Palmetto State. Data shows that unionized government workers in South Carolina make 4% less than their non-union counterparts.


Jobs & Economy In the News

SC Job Climate Snapshot: Spring 2017

According to the most recent data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the SC Department of […]

Why it Matters: SC’s Labor Force Participation Rate

While the unemployment rate is important, it does not paint a very full picture of the economy.

The Wrong Solution for a Real Problem

How can we be compassionately responsive to the needs of low-to-middle income South Carolinians in regards to housing affordability?